Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts

Subchapter E. Middle School, Adopted 2013

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter E issued under the Texas Education Code, §7.102(c)(4) and §28.002, unless otherwise noted.

§117.201. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts, Middle School, Adopted 2013.

  1. The provisions of §§117.201-117.213 of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts.
  2. No later than August 31, 2014, the commissioner of education shall determine whether instructional materials funding has been made available to Texas public schools for materials that cover the essential knowledge and skills for fine arts as adopted in §§117.201-117.213 of this subchapter.
  3. If the commissioner makes the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, §§117.201-117.213 of this subchapter shall be implemented beginning with the 2015-2016 school year and apply to the 2015-2016 and subsequent school years.
  4. If the commissioner does not make the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, the commissioner shall determine no later than August 31 of each subsequent school year whether instructional materials funding has been made available. If the commissioner determines that instructional materials funding has been made available, the commissioner shall notify the State Board of Education and school districts that §§117.201-117.213 of this subchapter shall be implemented for the following school year.
  5. Sections 117.31-117.40 of this chapter shall be superseded by the implementation of §§117.201-117.213 under this section.
Source: The provisions of this §117.201 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.

§117.209. Music, Middle School 2, Adopted 2013.

  1. General requirements. Students enrolled in the second year of music may select from the following courses: Middle School 2 Band, Middle School 2 Choir, Middle School 2 Orchestra, Middle School 2 Jazz Ensemble, Middle School 2 Instrumental Ensemble, or Middle School 2 Vocal Ensemble.
  2. Introduction.
    1. The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.
    2. Four basic strands–foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response–provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student’s intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.
    3. Statements that contain the word “including” reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase “such as” are intended as possible illustrative examples.
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  4. Knowledge and skills.
    Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sound. The student explores fundamental skills appropriate for a developing young musician. The student is expected to:

    1. compare and contrast exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;
    2. demonstrate knowledge of tonal and rhythmic musical elements using standard terminology such as instrumentation, voicing, intervals, solfège, absolute note names, rhythmic values, and counting systems;
    3. demonstrate knowledge of musical elements of rhythm, including whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, paired and single eighth notes, sixteenth notes, syncopated patterns, corresponding rests, and meter, including 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, and 6/8, using standard terminology;
    4. interpret musical forms such as binary, ternary, phrasic, rondo, and theme and variations presented aurally and through music notation; and
    5. describe health and wellness concepts related to musical practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practice.
    Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and writes music notation using an established system for rhythm and melody. The student is expected to:

    1. interpret music symbols and terms referring to notation, including fermata and coda; dynamics, including pianissimo to fortissimo; tempi, including andante, largo and adagio; and articulations, including accent, marcato, and previously known elements;
    2. notate meter, rhythm, pitch, and dynamics using standard symbols in a handwritten or computer-generated format;
    3. create increasingly complex rhythmic phrases, using known rhythms, and melodic phrases, using known pitches, within an established system of notation;
    4. read music notation using appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses such as inner hearing, silent fingering, shadow bowing, or Curwen hand signs; and
    5. sight-read unison, homophonic, and polyphonic music using the appropriate clef in a minimum of three keys and three meters, including 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4.
    Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument, alone and in groups, performing a variety of unison, homophonic, and polyphonic repertoire. The student makes music at an appropriate level of difficulty and performs in a variety of genres from notation and by memory. The student is expected to:

    1. demonstrate, alone and in groups, characteristic vocal or instrumental timbre;
    2. perform music, alone and in groups, demonstrating appropriate physical fundamental techniques such as hand position, bowing, embouchure, articulation, and posture;
    3. perform independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, demonstrating fundamental skills and appropriate solo, small ensemble, and large ensemble performance techniques;
    4. perform independently and expressively a varied repertoire of music representing various styles and cultures;
    5. sight-read independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, demonstrating fundamental skills and appropriate solo, small ensemble, and large ensemble performance techniques in known keys and rhythms;
    6. interpret music symbols and terms referring to previously known elements; notation, including fermata and coda; keys; clefs; dynamics, including pianissimo to fortissimo; tempi, including andante, largo, and adagio; and articulations, including accent and marcato, appropriately when performing; and
    7. create increasingly complex rhythmic phrases using known rhythms and melodic phrases using known pitches at an appropriate level of difficulty.
    Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

    1. perform music such as “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Texas, Our Texas” that is representative of diverse cultures, including American and Texas heritage;
    2. examine written and aurally presented music representative of diverse genres, styles, periods, and cultures;
    3. identify relationships of music content and processes to other academic disciplines such as the relationship between music and mathematics, literature, history, and the sciences; and
    4. describe music-related vocations and avocations.
    Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in both formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

    1. demonstrate appropriate concert and stage etiquette as an informed, actively involved listener and performer during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;
    2. apply criteria for listening to and evaluating musical performances;
    3. demonstrate processes and select the tools for self-evaluation and personal artistic improvement such as critical listening to individual and group performance recordings;
    4. identify and apply criteria for evaluating personal performances;
    5. evaluate the quality and effectiveness of musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models; and
    6. demonstrate appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses to music and musical performances.
Source: The provisions of this §117.209 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.