Summit 18: Designing Deep Learning Experiences in the Arts with T-TESS

Background:

The Texas Teacher Evaluation System (T-TESS) is a comprehensive, performance-based evaluation system. In order to be concrete enough to inform daily practice, TEA distilled these standards into four domains:

  1. Planning
  2. Instruction
  3. Learning Environment
  4. Professional Practices and Responsibilities

At this year’s Summit, CEDFA presenters will step participants through each of these four domains using specific examples from three or more case studies gathered throughout the school year.

The four sessions of the Summit include the following:

  • Session 1: Structuring Deep Learning Experiences
  • Session 2: Designing Instruction Around Higher-level Questions
  • Session 3: Responding to Learner Needs
  • Session 4: Modeling Excellence in Fine Arts Education

Session 1: Structuring Deep Learning Experiences

Session 1 revolves around the T-TESS Domain 1: Planning. Participants investigate the planning structures they use to design deeply engaging learning experiences that are flexible enough to meet the needs of all of their students.

Session 2: Designing Instruction around Higher-level Questions

During Session 2, presenters demonstrate how to utilize higher-level questioning as a core strategy during instruction.

Session 3: Responding to Learner Needs

Session 3 is about student engagement. Teachers respond to learner needs by adjusting instruction, modifying the classroom environment, altering routines, and making norms explicit. Teachers and students collaborate to create a classroom culture that promotes accessibility and efficiency, maintains clear expectations for student behavior, and encourages deep levels of learning and engagement.

Session 4: Modeling Excellence in Fine Arts Education

During the final session, presenters turn the focus back to the individual teacher’s professional practice. How do teachers model the conceptual thinking, designing, and executing skills necessary for contemporary professional practice in art, music, dance, and theatre? What does “thinking like an artist” mean for teachers bent on modeling excellence for their students?

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